Ford Bronco Onboard Welding

 

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Ford Bronco Onboard Welding

 

 


Welder

Premier Power Welder

Homemade Welder

Big Look Panel Meter

http://www.laurels.com/dcmeter.htm

 

 

IMPORTANT--Find the ignition wire from the old harness -- splice it to our BROWN wire. Take all other wires from the old harness and tape them up and tie them off somewhere. DO NOT attach any of these to the new alternator.

 

160 AMP

ROTOR RPM

AMPS @ 13.5 VOLTS

2000

87

67

2500

117

97

3000

130

110

3500

136

116

4000

141

121

4500

145

125

5000

148

128

5500

150

130

6000

152

132

6500

153

133

7000

160

140


PPW-supplied 25' heavy-gauge cables

The ground cable has a heavy duty ground clamp and the hot cable has a high quality rod holder

 

 


Welding Operation:
To weld, you need to do the following:

 

When welding on your OWN vehicle, use only REVERSE POLARITY. Positive to electrode holder; Negative to work/ground. Never weld on your own vehicle with your Premier Power Welder in straight polarity. Also do not weld with Ready Welder or any other unit using straight polarity wire, on your own vehicle.

IMPORTANT!!
REMEMBER TO SHUT DOWN YOUR PREMIER IN REVERSE SEQUENCE: THROTTLE DOWN FIRST, THEN TURN OFF THE MASTER SWITCH AND BOOSTER (OR POWER-TOOL SWITCH). FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN THE SOLENOID IN THE BOX STICKING AND NOT ALLOWING THE UNIT TO SWITCH BACK INTO THE CHARGING MODE. IF THIS HAPPENS, TAKE THE TOP OFF AND TAP ON THE SOLENOID WITH SOMETHING, THEN PUT IT BACK TOGETHER.

 

Remember: You have three hours of welding/ power-outlet use maximum (if you have a new battery) without recharging. To minimize this loss, whenever your unit is not in use, turn the master switch OFF. This will put you into "charge" mode and keep your battery charged, which will give you more welding time.

 


Power Tool Operation:
 To set up for 115V operation, do the following:

 


Welding Rod Numbers Decoded

Typical arc welding rod has a part number like: E6010 or a fancy one is E8018-B1-H4R.

Peterson's 4-Wheel & Off-Road November 2002 states:

Pat Gremillion of Premier Power Welder recommends using a 6011 rod in the 3/32 inch size to get the feel for your welder.

 

AWS Classifications Explained

The American Welding Society (AWS) numbering system can tell a welder quite a bit about a specific stick electrode including what application it works best in and how it should be used to maximize performance. With that in mind, let's take a look at the system and how it works.


The prefix "E" designates an arc welding electrode. The first two digits of a 4-digit number and the first three digits of 5-digit number indicate tensile strength (typical vales are 60,70,80,90,100,110). For example, E6010 is a 60,000 psi tensile strength electrode while E10018 designates a 100,000 psi tensile strength electrode.  To figure out the strength of the weld, take the 2 digits, in this case 60, and multiply by 1000 to get the weld strength in PSI.

E

60

1

"10"

Electrode

Tensile strength

Position

Type of Coating and Current

 


The 3rd digit tells you what position the rod is recommended for.

1 : Flat, Horizontal, Vertical, Overhead.
2 : Flat and Horizontal only.
3 : Flat, Horizontal, Vertical Down, Overhead.

Peterson's 4-Wheel & Off-Road November 2002 states (which seems to be inaccurate):

1 All positions (flat, horizontal, vertical, overhead)

2 horizontal and flat

3 flat only


The last two digits tells you about welding current and the coating.

 

Digit

Type of Coating

Welding Current

10

High cellulose sodium

DC+

11

High cellulose potassium

AC or DC+ or DC-

12

High titania sodium

AC or DC-

13

High titania potassium

AC or DC+

14

iron power titania

AC or DC- or DC+

15

low hydrogen sodium

DC+

16

low hydrogen potassium

AC or DC+

27

iron powder iron oxide

AC or DC+ or DC-

18

iron powder low hydrogen

AC or DC+

20

High iron oxide

AC or DC+ or DC-

22

High iron oxide

AC or DC-

24

iron powder titania

AC or DC- or DC+

28

Low hydrogen potassium iron powder

AC or DC+

 

The rod + will give deeper penetration, and the rod - will give faster deposition.

Peterson's 4-Wheel & Off-Road November 2002 states:

Unless you are an experienced stick welder, stick with rods that end in either 1 or 3 since these will work in either AC or DC currents and straight or reversed polarity.

 

If there is a letter and number combination next, it relates to the chemical composition of the weld deposit.

 

 

Ni

Cr

Mo

Mn

V

A1

   

0.5%

   

B1

 

0.5%

0.5%

   

B2

 

1.25%

0.5%

   

B3

 

2.25%

1%

   

C1

2.5%

       

C2

3.25%

       

C3

1%

 

0.35%

   

D1

 

0.15%

0.25-0.45%

1.25-2%

 

D2

   

0.25-0.45%

1.25-2%

 

G

0.5%

>0.3%

>0.2%

 

>0.1%

* (G only needs one of the elements listed)
Next part is a H#. This relates to the maximum amount of hydrogen that will be diffused from the rod.


A trailing R means that the rod is moisture resistant.

As a welder, there are certain electrodes that you will most likely see and use time and time again as you go about your daily operations. A DC machine produces a smoother arc. DC rated electrodes will only run on a DC welding machine. Electrodes which are rated for AC welding are more forgiving and can also be used with a DC machine. Here are some of the most common electrodes and how they are typically used:

 

E6010
DC only and designed for putting the root bead on the inside of a piece of pipe, this is the most penetrating arc of all. It is tops to dig through rust, oil, paint or dirt. It is an all-position electrode that beginning welders usually find extremely difficult, but is loved by pipeline welders world-wide. Lincoln 5P+ sets the standard in this category.

 

E6011
This electrode is used for all-position AC welding or for welding on rusty, dirty, less-than-new metal. It has a deep, penetrating arc and is often the first choice for repair or maintenance work when DC is unavailable. The most common Lincoln product is Fleetweld® 180 for hobby and novice users. Industrial users typically prefer Fleetweld 35.

 

E6013
This all-position, AC electrode is used for welding clean, new sheet metal. Its soft arc has minimal spatter, moderate penetration and an easy-to-clean slag. Lincoln Fleetweld® 37 is most common of this type.

 

E7018
A low-hydrogen, usually DC, all-position electrode used when quality is an issue or for hard-to-weld metals. It has the capability of producing more uniform weld metal, which has better impact properties at temperatures below zero. The Lincoln products are typically Jetweld® LH-78 or our new Excalibur® 7018.

 

E7024
Typically used to make a large weld downhand with AC in plate that is at least ¼" thick, but more commonly used for plate that is ½" and up. Lincoln has several electrodes in this category that are called Jetweld® 1, 2, or 3.

 

Other Electrodes
Although not nearly as common, an electrode may have additional numbers after it such as E8018-B2H4R. In this case, the "B2" indicates chemical composition of the weld metal deposit. The "H4" is the diffusible hydrogen designator, which indicates the maximum diffusible hydrogen level obtained with the product. And "R" stands for the moisture resistant designator to indicate the electrode's ability to meet specific low moisture pickup limits under controlled humidification tests.

 


 

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